Our Exhibition Stand Design Ideas Blog contains the latest ideas, trends, and innovations in the exhibition & event industry.

We've collated some of the most inspiration projects we've seen, highlighting the companies that created them as well as the potential applications they could have for your own exhibition stand displays. These range from modular exhibition stands, to lighting designs and interesting uses of materials. We want our exhibition stand ideas blog to be as useful as possible, so if you have any feedback for would like to let us know about a project please feel free to get in touch. If you're looking for more interior design inspiration, see our Retail Design Blog

 

Jump to a specific month:

2017:   January   February   March   April   May   June   July   August

2016:   June   July   August   September   October   November   December

 

August

Deck 5 and KL Druck

lightbox exhibition stand design ideas

Our highlight of this month’s exhibition stand designs come from Deck 5 and KL Druck, who recently exhibited at EuroShop. Rather than designing something completely bespoke, this stand encompasses a range of standard display features such as LED light boxes and tension fabric systems, but displays them in a truly unique way.

With light boxes and curved tension fabric systems hung from the ceiling, it’s impossible to miss the stand from afar, however up close - there’s also some intricate details that allow this space to stand out. We particularly love the 90 degree curved lightbox that surrounds a seating area.

 

Tejas Borja

tejas borja exhibition stand designs ideas

Tejas Borja have created an exhibition stand that, as a result of a clever layout within, makes the stand feel like a closed space at the same time as providing visibility throughout the entire stand.

We’ve seen exhibition stands that have integrated slotted panels and display systems, however this one is unique because of the way the entrances and graphic displays have been placed. With two entrances on each corner of the stand, the slotted wooden beams have been stepped back and replaced with a solid graphic panel - creating a clear entrance and the interpretation of privacy within.

 

Jaded

jaded exhibition stand design

Our final features stand for August takes a creative approach to capturing attention. Whilst at Unibox we’re passionate about using advanced lighting techniques, sometimes the most creative approaches can catch the eye.

Here Jaded used standard lighting with hundreds of balloons tied to the top of the structure that gave the stand a blue hue, whilst the beautifully designed seating area drew visitors in.

 

July

Deutsche Telekom

deutsche telekom exhibition stand design ideas

There are two standout features of this exhibition, the first being an excellent implementation of a theme throughout the stand design. The construction-based design theme is apparent on all areas of the stand, from the crates used as exhibition counters and vinyl graphics applied to structural pillars, the whole environment grabs your attention and intrigues visitors towards the stand.

The second is the use of lighting & colour. It can be difficult to stand out in crowded exhibition halls, and the reason this stand achieves that feat so effectively is a use of two main colours, white and fluorescent pink, both of which reflect light well creating a glow around the stand. We’ve found that fluorescent colours are being implemented in multiple sectors, from exhibition to retail - most recently used by SuperDry in their Store of the Future concept, where fluorescent fabrics were combined with LED illuminated light boxes to draw attention to key areas of the store.

 

Hilton

Hilton exhibition stand designs ideas

In contrast to Deutsche Telekom’s awareness building stand design, Hilton were looking to provide a much more discreet area for their potential hospitality clients, demonstrating their brand values of comfort and quality.

Creating meeting spaces within stand design is a challenge, as you’re looking to attract visitors to engage with the stand without creating private surroundings that naturally block visitors line of sight. Utilising a central lighting element around Hilton’s logo and a suspended fabric graphic drawing attention above the stand, the use of semi-transparent acrylic walls allowed branding to be placed throughout the exterior of the stand, without compromising privacy once a visitor engages.

 

Case Furniture

case furniture exhibition stand design

Working with Unibox, London-based furniture designers, Case Furniture, required a number of displays for their upcoming exhibition in New York. With this type of stand design it’s imperative that the display elements themselves ensure full focus is on the products, simply complementing the products on display.

We helped Case Furniture create a minimal stand space that attracted attention via the large plinth-mounted LED Lightbox, utilising the 25|25 slimline product frameworks to display products alongside a seamless tension fabric feature display creating individual spaces.

 

June

Pedrali

pedrali exhibition stand design ideas

Pedrali launched their new collection at Salone Del Mobile in Milan earlier this year, with a brilliant use of their exhibition space. Whilst the space they have available is vast, Pedrali separate each of the new products within their collection and set each area with its own merchandising & colour schemes, which combined with the platform that the products are raised on, creates an eye-catching, engaging exhibition stand idea.

Keeping the exterior of each pod white ensures the colour doesn’t distract from other displays, whilst in stark contract, the interior has added texture that intrigues passers by.

 

A&B Project

AB Project exhibition stand designs ideas

What caught our eye on this stand was the use of lighting, which has been used minimally but the incredible effect. The linear strips add an eye-catching element to the stand, however it comes into its own when combined with texture of the inset real moss strips.

We’ve recently collaborated with Innerspace Cheshire - who are specialists in specifying materials for design, such as the real moss strips used here. A&B project has retained the authentic look of the moss here, however it can be coloured to stay in line with your own brand aesthetic.

 

Gibam

gibam exhibition stand design

Gibam’s concept was introduced at EuroShop 2017 and looks brilliant. From a design perspective, the first thing you notice is the matte black finish to the frames, which when used on deep profiles such as in this example create a clear frame around product areas.

By combining the black framework and semitransparent graphics above, this allows the light grain wood displays and focus lighting to take focus, ensuring that although there are multiple product features within the area, each is highlighted with its own light source and visitors aren’t distracted.

 

May

effebi

effebi exhibition stand design

Effebi created a unique space at EuroShop, with their stand seemingly split into a custom build area - featuring beautiful material finishes, and a less structured approach on the reverse - providing an open & inviting feel.

Along the main concourse effebi have created a high visibility display, utilising LED signage and integrated branding to brilliant effect, especially where the logo is repeated on the dark grain wooden panel.  At the back of the stand, thin wooden pieces have been interlinked to provide both the sense of privacy whilst on the stand, at the same time as creating intrigue to passers by as they can see into the stand and a subtle change in colour. 

 

sfd.

sfd exhibition stand design

Continuing the sense of intrigue as effebi did above, sfd. created an amazing space at EuroShop. Again, by using a material that allows some transparency has created intrigue to visitors outside of the stand, which when combined with the powerful messaging and exterior graphics (we particularly like the use of the projector onto the graphics) results in a stunning space.

The objective of sfd.’s stand was brand communication, using technology, lighting and other way finding methods to direct visitors to the centre of the stand, where the theatrical approach to design continued with beautifully finished display stands and a monochrome aesthetic creating a clear message for visitors.

 

AEG

aeg exhibition stand design

AEG have created  high quality finish to their space, with their careful use of finishes mixed with animated graphics & technology. Firstly, the finishes used created a homely feel, which is the clear objective of the space as they’re promoting high end appliances. Lighting has been incorporated as a design feature, matching the matte black finish of the walls and interior frameworks, which look stunning (especially the ceiling-hung display). 

However the stand out element for us is the introduction of animated displays throughout the stand. Moving graphics have been applied to the exterior of the stand on a large scale to attract attention, which is then reinforced once visitors move onto the stand by placing displays alongside featured products, not only attracting them to the product display but also providing the opportunity to educate and subsequently convert the visitor.  

 

April

Gaggenau

Exhibition Stands

Gaggenau have taken a minimal approach to their stand design, to brilliant effect. The exterior of the stand consists of a single illuminated logo, with the inside of the stand enticing visitors to look further as it’s partially obscured. 

The simple way Gaggenau have displayed their products is particularly exciting, as the black theme continues until you reach a recessed point in the wall, which features halo linear lighting and a mirrored back panel. This is a visually stimulating method of creating full focus on your products, albeit a bold move.

 

Riga Museum

Exhibition Stands

The Riga Motor Museum have used illuminated graphic displays in unconventional (but completely achievable!) ways in their new permanent exhibition. The first display provides context to the cars on display, with a brick-style graphic applied, to which a projection of the car is played. As this is seemingly integrated into the entirety of the display, it’s a great way of drawing attention.

We particularly love how displays of different sizes & angles have been combined to simulate a crash, or a cracked windscreen - again providing context surrounding the car in front of the display, but also an engaging focal point.

Learn more about how to create custom Lightboxes here

 

Coordination Asia

Exhibition Stands

Coordination Asia’s G+Maze display highlights how simple it can be to create beautiful exhibition spaces. Using illumination within the ‘maze’, carefully positioned around a series of mirrors and doorways, it creates a visual trick that brings out the curiosity in visitors. Effects like this can be created on a small & large scale, both looking equally effective whilst potentially providing more visitor engagement.

 

March

Nike

Exhibition Stands Nike

Nike’s design team have once again created a brilliantly simple exhibition space, that perfectly highlights their exhibits. Taking a simple matte white framework, combined with a solid black background, each display is already framed well. 

In addition to this, a mess style backing has been applied to create a different texture around each item, which is brilliantly surrounding in vertical strips of neon lighting. Using this type of lighting is a master-stroke, as the glow carries through to the floor as well as the black surrounds, creating individual pockets of light for each display.

 

The V&A Foil Installation

Exhibition Stands VA

The V&A’s medieval tapestries have had a new texture transmitted to them, through the installation of 50,000 foil triangles as part of Benjamin Hubert’s display. 

Using mechanical arms, the foil ripples smoothly, with the light that shines directly onto the foil from above being projected in brilliant patterns across the artwork.

This serves as a reminder that common materials can be used intelligently to add new, eye-catching dimensions to exhibition displays.

 

Patternity

Exhibition Stands Patternity

Created as part of London Design Week, Patternity have created a graphic climbing wall for London’s Ace Hotel. A climbing wall isn’t something we thought we’d cover as part of an exhibition design blog, but the attraction has generated a lot of attention due to the new graphic design applied to relatively well-known piece of sports equipment.

We’re not sure how many of the visitors were ready to climb the wall itself, but this is an effortlessly cool way of creating a buzz around an exhibition space, and generating interaction in the form of participation & social sharing.

 

February

Dalziel & Pow

Exhibition Stands

Dalziel & Pow have designed an exhibition in the Houses of Parliament, supporting the Newline Charity. The design of this space is particularly arresting because of the initially simple concept of displaying much-needed equipment for children by the charity, taped off by police-corden style strips. 

The message behind this stand is easily transmitted with the materials on display, which is testament to the design itself. Using this style of tape is particularly clever, as it’s viewed by the general public in very limited instances, wrapping the framework in this branded version clearly catches the eye.

 

Coca-Cola

Exhibition Stands

Coca-cola have created an experiential space that takes a very simple concept, that’s instantly recognisable and applies this concept to the whole space.

The centre-piece of this display is a seven meter wide, golden finished bar, with ‘bubbles’ rising from the centre. Using generative parameter c software, the bubbles were made out of more than five hundred translucent acrylic spheres that simulated the physical behaviour of sparkling bubbles. The visual effect of movement is enhanced by lightning system programmed to react on different events that the space will hold, such as concerts and sports games.

 

Enercon

Exhibition Stands

Enercon represent what can be created when working with large-scale budgets, but although the space is huge, the company clearly have an objective, that is the focal point of the entire stand.

This objective is meeting space. Without sacrificing on design, Enercon have created a two-tier space that has meeting areas in abundance, whilst creating privacy that is much needed in a location like this. 

When combined with the overall look & feel of the stand, which is clean and instantly ties in with Enercon’s branding, this is a high impact, conversion driven exhibition space that we can all take a message from - to remain focused on our objective when exhibiting, and design around this.

 

January 2017

Massana School of Art & Design

Exhibition Stand Display

We love this modular display system created by the Massana School of Art & Design. The supporting framework has been created with different shapes integrated into the metal itself, which allows a huge range of configurations to be created when the panels are joined together. 

The most obvious application is symmetrical shapes, however it’s when a variety of different shapes are combined that this system truly comes to life. Simple printed panels can be mounted onto the system which bring the displays to life, highlighting certain products or creating shelving displays.

This system shows that signage & artwork doesn’t need to cover all areas of an exhibition stand, sometimes creating smaller displays with interesting shapes integrated into the framework can be equally eye-catching.

 

Paul Smith

Paul Smith Exhibition Stand Design

Paul Smith has developed an exhibition, aptly named ‘hello, my name is paul smith’, which was first displayed at the London Design Museum, and is currently touring the world.

With these latest images coming from the Japan leg of the tour, we see how simple displays can have a brilliant effect when displaying new products or increasing brand awareness. The first display we’re drawn to is the classic Paul Smith coloured Mini, on a matching plinth. 

The timeline display which has been wall-mounted and secured behind glass is another great example of story-telling in an exhibition space, with the pieces carefully curated to ensure visitors get a feel for the history of Paul Smiths designs, without an overbearing amount of information.

 

Sony

Song Exhibition Stand Display

In a more temporary-looking environment, Sony celebrated their 70th anniversary displaying some of the technology they’re renowned for in their well-established Sony-building.

A simple back panel graphic featuring pictures of their range of technology throughout the years provides a great setting for the display, providing nostalgia to visitors & employees that will see the exhibit, but also allowing younger visitors to appreciate where the company first began innovating.

The takeaway from this display for us is the use of cones & tape surrounding actual artefacts from the Sony vault. Although the security of these items might be questionable, creating branded cones & tape instantly creates an eye-catching area. Whether this is subconscious or not, it automatically draws the eye and could be put to good use in formal exhibition environments.

 

December 2016

Nike

Nike Exhibition Design

Transforming an art gallery into a temporary Nike Studio, Co-ordination Asia showcased how exhibitors can use dynamic graphics in combination to create a stunning environment.

The space itself is incredibly simple, relying on the instantly recognisable brand typography and colours to identify the company. However, the use of lighting is particularly clever on two levels.

The first is the moving graphics behind each display. Using dynamic LED panels, each display has been programmed to include messages that also result in a visual effect across all five panels. This is particularly effective when it comes to updating the graphics, as each panel can either work in combination, or act as a standalone promotional display.

The second, and more subtle, application is the high powered spotlights shining down the face of the moving displays. These catch the silhouette of the shoes which have been mounted onto the display, creating footprints at the base. Although it’s a simple method of illuminating products, the effect created instantly catches the eye.

 

Tom Dixon

Tom Dixon Material Exhibition Design

The king of material design, Tom Dixon, created a fascinating exhibition space at Milan Design Week utilising different textures and unusual materials. What we particularly liked about Tom’s approach, is the signage surrounding the area created to catch the eye of designers visiting Milan.

A brilliantly simple display comprising of cardboard boxes which were printed with Tom Dixon’s logo greeted visitors, pointing them in the way of the full exhibition space. This shows that sometimes complex graphics aren’t necessary, and putting every day objects to a new use can be equally eye catching.

Continuing with this theme, once in the exhibition space, materials such as chipboard with spray painted logos directed visitors around the stand, with simple graphics illustrating the difference in product zones.

 

SET Architects

SET Architect Exhibition Design

Our final example of interesting material use comes from SET architects, who created a modular pop-up stand, with translucent materials integrated into the framework itself, creating the illusion of private areas without the framework to support it.

A thin gauge framework was used to create the freestanding structure, which was separated into two levels, with the bottom level used to accommodate messaging and screens, and the upper level used to create shapes and introduce lighting.

The use of biodegradable jute black cloth meant that it was incredibly easy to manipulate once the structure was built, whilst providing enough strength with a slight translucency to catch the eye and ensure passers by could still see the screens within. 

 

November 2016

Integration 

Exhibition Wood Finish Displays

The most straightforward application of wood is to use a ‘framing’ principle, using the finish to surround your stand or product that creates a difference in textures, catching the eye.

The first example is a small-scale use of a wood finish without a backdrop behind, integrated into the side panel of an exhibition stand. This is a clever isolated use, especially considering the concrete finish that the display has been integrated into. 

The same concept is applied to our second example, which integrated a wood finish on a larger scale surrounding the stand. This method frames the stand, and provides the visitor with a focus point towards the inside of the stand, meaning visitors are more likely to approach the stand or engage with the artwork on display.

 

Display 

Exhibition Wood Finish Displays

Wood, in isolation, is rarely used as a design feature in a method more than full sheet panels. This is a truly inspiration stand design using sections of pallet-style wood panels, mounted onto the white exterior of the stand itself. 

Each direction of wooden panel has been carefully designed to accommodate for the logo and graphic treatments throughout the display, especially on the larger elements of the stand walls. However in contrast, the finish provides a brilliant concept for the smaller panels, designed to create some privacy in seated areas.

This design shows that integrating wood finishes onto displays doesn’t need to be overly complex, and can be simply applied onto pre-existing structures.

 

Pallets

Exhibition Wood Finish Displays

A more direct route to approach utilising wood finishes, Pallets are the definition of authentic design, which are again becoming more prominent in exhibition design.

To highlight what’s possible using Pallets, we’ve seen a concept which applies a solid colour to the top of the pallet, to tie in with branding or the products displayed. This results in a more premium finish to the pallet, combining the original authentic element of the finish, with a higher quality treatment that produces a contemporary display. 

Our final example showcases how pallets can be used to create a structure, rather than being stacked for product display. Although we’re sure this is mounted to a more stable backdrop (we hope!), the pallets protrude from the display, creating a multi-depth display, which when combined with screens & graphic displays makes a bright, spacious exhibition space.

 

October 2016


Framing

Exhibition Neon Display

The first, most common use for neon outside of signage, is as a framing tool. Its natural glow attracts the eye, and can be used incredibly effectively as a surround for product displays and high profile items. We came across the ‘Time Tunnel’, which utilises a standalone display area and horizontally suspended neon squares to surround featured products. The brilliance of this display is that due to the glow of the neon, a virtual floor & ceiling is created, giving the floating effect that is the natural draw of the display.
 

 

Used in a more direct way (and on a much grander scale!), the “Astronomy Domine” installation surrounds Henri VI’s statue, providing a direct source of light and a framing tool to attract attention. Used on a smaller scale, this application of neon would work incredibly well, especially in an event space where there are multiple visual cues at any one point, so creating a product surround of high intensity light would be a welcome focus point.

 

Standalone displays

Exhibition Neon Display

One of the most inspirational events we’ve seen features neon-style linear lighting integrated into a modular framework, for the “Serpentine Pavilion Intervention”. An incredible structure created on a huge scale, with different level heights for each cube section.

The clever part of this display comes in two parts; the integration of the lighting & the programmed effects. The lighting is integrated into the channel of each profile throughout the structure, which when viewed in context from a distance displays a large glow, giving a ‘lightning’ effect. Programming the lighting itself doesn’t present a great challenge, however creating the effects is more complex, which results in an amazing linear display.
 

Exhibition Neon Displays

The second display takes a much more simplistic approach, with equally breathtaking results. Creating two spheres, one mounted within the other, results in a display with multiple depths. Especially when combined with higher level lighting on the inner sphere, allows the user to configure different variations of display.

This type of display is perfect for event environments, especially where space is at a premium. In addition to this, complex lighting displays attract a high amount of sharing via social media and other channels, which is a key indicator for performance at exhibitions nowadays. 

 

Display

Exhibition Neon Displays

Perhaps the most common use of neon, especially currently at exhibition and events, is as a signage or promotional tool. We rarely see neon in any other setting than wall-mounted, and our first example challenges this. 

Created for the Tate, this is a curved, ceiling hung neon display spelling out “In Girum Imus Nocte et Consumimur Igni”. Neon used in this way looks brilliant, and has been produced using simple ceiling hung wire cables, four of which carry electrical power. Although using traditional neon might present a challenge, the new LED derivatives are much easier to control, with the capability of being manipulated into different shapes, as well as mounted into a huge range of custom boxes/back panels/even simply displayed alone.

Our final example combines a framing effect as we discussed earlier, clearly marking the entrance to the exhibition stand, and displays integrated into the side of the exhibition stand. Simple linear illumination can be used around the perimeter of the stand, however the display to the side is more complex, with the illumination mounted within the wall itself. This is something that can only be created with the new variation of neon, with a coated acrylic panel integrated into a backlit display.

 

September 2016

Airbus

Airbus Exhibition Stand Virtual Reality

The first stand we look at is the Airbus stand at the Defence and Security Exhibition. The exhibition itself is aimed at top level military personnel, and major procurement officials - and while we’re not saying this exhibition shouldn’t be interesting, it definitely serves a functional service, rather than providing inspiration. 

Airbus decided to challenge this, by creating their entire stand around a virtual reality playground. They introduced individual pods, with mounted sound bars integrating into Oculus Rift headsets, that immersed viewers in three different airspace environments. 

Using VR had two benefits for Airbus. One is the fact that many of their parts and equipment would potentially fill the entire exhibition hall, therefore using VR meant they could introduce/demo pieces of kit without the logistical headache. The second is the more obvious benefit, in that it created an engaging experience that naturally attracted visitors to the stand by word of mouth. Introducing multiple pods rather than one or two meant participation didn’t feel awkward, as sometimes introducing new technology that people aren’t used to interacting with causes some discomfort…
 

Siemens

 

Siemens took things one step further, creating an exhibition stand that contained a custom VR solution. However, how they translated that to visitors to the exhibition stand was really interesting. 

Rather than relying on the headsets/word of mouth itself to pass around the exhibition, there were screens that live-streamed users interacting with the software, which worked well for both creating an attention grabbing graphic, and breaking down the barrier of the unknown - so visitors wanted to try the system themselves now they know what happens throughout the experience.

 

dock10

DOCK10 Exhibition Stand Virtual Reality

Our Marketing team witnessed Dock10’s use of VR first hand, at the Prolific North exhibition. Dock10 are a media studio based in Media City, offering post & content platform production. Before the exhibition, they partnered with ‘The Voice’ to use a 4K multi-rig in the studio, which captured the show from every angle.

Dock10 showcased this technology at Prolific North, an exhibition targeted towards content & marketing professionals. Making the most of their limited stand space, they kept the stand design itself simple, with branded graphics surrounding the technology.

This shows the extent of how VR can engage passers by, with visitors simply having to be wearing the headset for interest to be generated. For companies exhibiting in small exhibition spaces, introducing leading technology such as this, with relevant content, can create more exposure than having larger stand space!

 

Unibox VR  Experiment

Unibox Exhibition Stand Virtual Reality

Although arguably less complex than the system Siemens have created (don’t tell our Head of Creative - Duncan I said that!), we created a VR-style shop that contained more information on our products, and how they apply to the areas they’re situated in.

We see this as a stepping stone for clients, as this doesn’t involve the expense of developing your own system, and it can run on anybody phone or computer. Similar to the way Siemens added interaction points to their system, adding in simple calls to action such as the ‘i’ button naturally draws people towards that area of the store. 

Bear in mind - this was a test environment, to see how the software worked, but it’s interesting nonetheless.

This looks brilliant on an iPhone (and other screens too!), see the experiment here: https://roundme.com/tour/33053/view/79764/

 

August 2016

Reggiani

Reggiani Brand Launch Event

Reggiani launched their new brand earlier this year, with renowned design agency Dalziel & Pow creating the perfect platform for their first exhibition stand. The use of illuminated signage mounted onto the top of their stand space ensured the new logo was visible from all areas, with brand colours used subtly in the archways of each entrance to the stand. 

Learn how to create brand specific illuminated LED signage here.

 

Perspex

Perspex Trade Show Stand Display

Perspex took a similar approach when creating their exhibition stand, using their own products to design a brilliantly complex display. Taking advantage of the height available, a clear brand message is applied, with the company’s logo taking full focus. Once visitors have approached the stand, Perspex use acrylic sheets machined to form different numbers to differentiate their offering. We love how they used lighting in moderation, which drew attention to important elements of the stand i.e. an enquiry desk, branding and product demos, in addition to how displays have been created both vertically and horizontally, adding an extra level of depth to the stand.

Learn more about how to create illuminated displays and lightboxes here.

 

G-Star B&&B Trend Event

G-Star Event Display

Finally, G Star chose Bread & Butter to create an unforgettable experience for a retail brand, using a range of natural materials to complement their latest collection. With this being a launch of new products, without these products actually being on sale, G Star had to create an experience that seamlessly translated to retail stores once visitors had left the show. Using materials that are ever-present in G Star stores worldwide, such as unfinished concrete, bright white lighting, and cold metalwork,  visitors were able to make the comparison between product areas and experiential zones, such as the outdoor timeline.
 

July 2016

Exhibition Stand Lighting

One of our favourite uses of light on an exhibition stand comes from Onok Lighting - so judging by the name, they should be pretty good. The outer walls of their exhibition stand show vivid colours depending on which angle you’re looking, with red, white and blue panels. Each panel is mounted in a frame that contains a thin strip of LED light, illuminating the edges of panel, demonstrating how colour can shift across large areas.

Inside the stand, Onok use two different coloured panels, a red and blue, to show the ambient effect of background colours on illuminated product displays. We also like how Onok have used different transparencies of infill panel, meaning some panels become opaque as the light travels through.

 

Nintendo Exhibition Stand

Taking a similar approach to Onok, Nintendo surrounded their stand in fabric and applied light at both the top and bottom. Nintendo cleverly applied different optics to each bank of LED lighting: The lighting at the bottom of the fabric creates a wall-wash effect - spreading the direction of light evenly over the surface, which looks incredibly effective when you see the range of colours Nintendo used around the perimeter of the display. 

The second use of lighting can be seen around the top edge of the fabrics, with a narrower optic applied that creates the stripe effect, concentrating a single beam of red light at an angle across the yellow light. This is a simple way to make an exhibition or event display stand out, with the original surrounding white fabric brought to life with LED lighting.

 

Exhibition Stands

Burkhardt Leitner’s exhibition space not only looks stunning, but creates a sense of light without having many points of illumination. Large spot lights are used along the ceiling of the display, but the use of materials and colour allow the light to reflect around the stand. This looks particularly effective when thin fabric substrates are used, as visitors can see a glimpse of the stand without having to go inside.

This still allows the exhibitor to brand the space, but in a more minimalist way, enticing visitors without shouting for attention, which may be a welcome change from busy exhibition halls. This effect isn’t a difficult look to achieve either - with simple white fabrics attached to a graphic display system, the illumination will create the rest of the look. 

 

June 2016

Square / 3D Hanging Displays

Hanging Banner Displays

This first example showcases how the banner itself can form the majority of the stand design, with the remaining space used minimally to create a meeting area. Utilising a lightweight frame, and 3D fabric graphics, the display has graphics covering 5 sides, providing complete visual coverage even when on the stand (usually using systems like this, the under-side of the display doesn’t contain a graphic). Using a system like this helps save on stand design costs, allowing the graphic to do the majority of the branding & awareness work.

Our second example shows a more subtle use of fabric display, with a narrower strip surrounding the stand space, used as higher level branding to entice people to the stand. Once visitors get there, screens and other displays are used to sell the products & services, but also having a ‘reception’ style desk makes them more approachable.

Learn how to create ceiling-hung exhibition graphic displays

 

Curved hanging banners

Curved Hanging Banners

A more simple, yet incredibly effective display method - circular hanging banners are perfect for smaller stand spaces, or for more crowded exhibitions where exhibitors are tightly packed together. Again using a tension fabric system, graphics are applied to a custom radius display that is hung from the ceiling.

As these systems are traditionally lightweight, due to the profile housing the graphics being simple & slim, the display is easy to put together and will comply with any restrictions exhibition halls may have on ceiling loading weights. Print technology has also progressed significantly, meaning the reverse of graphics doesn’t need to be seen on the inside of the banner, using blackout graphics - or you can use a double sided variation to create two different graphic treatments, without adding a significant amount of weight to the display.

Learn how to create curved exhibition graphic displays

 

Illuminated Displays

Lightbox Graphics Exhibitions

Bayer have used three illuminated lightbox displays to frame their exhibition stand, creating an open feel whilst providing highly visible signage that utilises Bayer’s branding and is an additional lighting source. We used LED Lightboxes to similar effect at the Retail Design Expo in 2015, that created a column at either end of the exhibition space whilst informing passers by of our products.

Used horizontally, lightboxes attract more attention due to the majority of ceiling hung displays being non-illuminated, which when combined with custom printed graphics on both horizontal and vertical displays, creates a highly visible stand.

LED Lightboxes are perfect awareness raising displays, especially when used at on a large scale. With interchangeable graphics, a huge benefit comes from reusing these displays for different shows, or promoting different products. 

Learn how to create illuminated exhibition graphic displays